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Brassboard Configuration – Definition

Brassboard Configuration Definition

Brassboard configuration is experimental model used outside of the laboratory environment, it is also called ‘out-of-the-laboratory testing model.’ This demonstration test model is used for field testing, it is used to determine the feasibility of the intended product.

A brassboard is often done after a breadboard which is a prototype stage, brass configuration is used in developing a technical and operational data for field testing.

A Little More on What is a Brassboard Configuration

A brassboard experimental method is a reflection of the operational functionality and physical configuration of a final product. This testing model is meant to be used outside the laboratory, it is for field testing. A brasboard is conducted after a breadboard must have been earlier conducted. Breadboards recreate dimensional constraints of final products but brassboard present the physical layout of the product.

Certain modifications have been made to the definition of a brassboard. In 1992, a book on proposal preparation defined it as a laboratory model that will operate in the same way as the final product but may or may not look like the final product.

A brassboard is a prototype stage done after engineering validation boards (EVB), before other final prototype stages are carried out. In the modern world, brasshards are circuit boards that have ten conductive layers, they are much larger than EVBs. However, it is also possible for EVB to be larger than a brassboard, some EVBs have eighteen conductive circuit layers.

There is one common characteristics of prototypes, they are not representations of the final project, they are just prototypes. However, a brassboard has a more robust a[proach, it is often close to the final design. It may look like the final product or may not but it usually operates the same way as the final system.

References for Brassboard Configuration

Academic Research on Brassboard Configuration

Progress in the development of a high data rate, high capacity Optical Disk Buffer, Levene, M. L. (1989, May). In Optical Data Storage Topical Meeting (Vol. 1078, pp. 105-112). International Society for Optics and Photonics.

Inertially stabilized two-axis gimbal for space laser communication systems: design description and test results, Mellon, R. R., & Owen, W. J. (1990, July). In Free-Space Laser Communication Technologies II (Vol. 1218, pp. 658-663). International Society for Optics and Photonics.

Second generation Raytheon Stirling/pulse tube hybrid cold head design and performance, Kirkconnell, C. S., Price, K. D., Ciccarelli, K. J., & Harvey, J. P. (2005). In Cryocoolers 13 (pp. 127-131). Springer, Boston, MA.

ST3: converting from the lab experiment to flight instrument, Cox, B., Danesh, P., & Konefat, E. H. (2001).

Converting from a lab experiment to a flight instrument, Cox, B., Danesh, P., & Konefat, E. H. (2001). In Aerospace Conference, 2001, IEEE Proceedings. (Vol. 4, pp. 4-2057). IEEE.

Flight test results from a low-power Doppler optical air data sensor, McGann, R. L. (1995, June). In Air Traffic Control Technologies (Vol. 2464, pp. 116-125). International Society for Optics and Photonics.

Goddard optical communications program, Seery, B. D. (1990, July). In Free-Space Laser Communication Technologies II(Vol. 1218, pp. 13-27). International Society for Optics and Photonics.

Electric Drivetrain for Hybrid Electric Bus, Gilbert, A. T., & Rehn, R. L. (1992). Electric Drivetrain for Hybrid Electric Bus (No. 920446).

Autonomous power system brassboard, Merolla, A. (1992). Autonomous power system brassboard.

Brassboard development of a MEMS-scanned ladar sensor for small ground robots, Stann, B. L., Dammann, J. F., Enke, J. A., Jian, P. S., Giza, M. M., Lawler, W. B., & Powers, M. A. (2011, June). In Laser Radar Technology and Applications XVI (Vol. 8037, p. 80371G). International Society for Optics and Photonics.

 

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