Consumer Advisory Council – Definition

Cite this article as:"Consumer Advisory Council – Definition," in The Business Professor, updated February 2, 2020, last accessed October 20, 2020, https://thebusinessprofessor.com/lesson/consumer-advisory-council-definition/.

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Consumer Advisory Council or CAC Definition

CAC was primarily created to provide a piece of responsive and driven advice needed to plan, implement, evaluate the activities carried out through the Assistive Technology (AT) Act. CAC serves as a consumers’ spokesperson that helps to achieve measurable goals from the perspective of consumers.

A Little More on What is the Consumer Advisory Council or CAC

The Consumer Advisory Committee is a legislative body of 30 members, each member is appointed for a period of 3 years. These members meet 3 times in a year at Washington DC. The CAC was founded in 1976 by the US Congress to support and advise the Federal Reserve Board. The CAC is working with the Federal Reserve Consumer Financial Services Committee. The creation of CAC led to the establishment of the Consumer Credit Protection Act in 1968. This legislation entails that consumers creditors must have obvious requirements, report interest rates, special credit terms and the total cost of potential borrowers. This legislation demands transparency of operations from the consumers creditors. It also entails that there should be diverse protection of debtor of fiscal problems and also a detailed credit. Lastly,

How the United States governments protect consumers?

It is strongly believed that only Consumer Protection Act enacted in 1968 protects consumers but, several were also enacted too. For-example, Fair credit reporting law or FCRA is one of the consumer protection laws. Likewise, other consumer protection laws are equal opportunity law, equality law, fair credit information law, truth law, and others were also established.

FCRA was enacted in 1970, ensures fairness, accuracy, and confidentiality of personal information contained in credit agency files.

Another is TILA, it is created solely to protect consumers’ transactions with creditors and also, among creditors too. It ensures that documents of the loan and interest rates are provided before the loan so as to ensure foreknowledge before loan acquisition.

References for Consumer Advisory Council

http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/Consumer-Advisory-Council-CAC.html

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/consumer-advisory-council-cac.asp

https://thelawdictionary.org/consumer-advisory-council-cac/

Academic Research for Consumer Advisory Council

The economic determinants of consumer complaints, Morris, D., & Reeson, D. (1978). The economic determinants of consumer complaints. European Journal of Marketing, 12(4), 275-282. Spotlights consumer complaints as an important signalling device — government action is undertaken as a result of them and they provide an index of consumer dissatisfaction which increases in importance as further data becomes available. Ranges across data relating to England and Wales which demonstrates that consumer durables, as a purchase category, are more likely to be involved in more complaints than other purchases. Determines that consumer complaints, therefore, are an important signalling device — even governments take action as a result of them. Proclaims that, despite the importance, consumer complaints have attracted little attention in the marketing, management and economics literature (this omission is much more marked in the UK than in the USA or the rest of western Europe). Announces that this work is primarily concerned with the ‘economic determinants of consumer complaints’ rather than with the socio‐economic or psychological characteristics of complaints. Continues in the second section by advancing some hypotheses concerning consumer complainants. Follows in the third section by describing the data, plus limitations, used for testing these hypotheses. Concludes in the final part with results and offers conclusive points.

Service charges as a source of bank income and their impact on consumers, Canner, G. B., & Kurtz, R. D. (1985). Service charges as a source of bank income and their impact on consumers. Fed. Res. Bull., 71, 609.

Listening to Cassandra: The Difficulty or Recognizing Risks and Taking Action, Needham, C. A. (2009). Listening to Cassandra: The Difficulty or Recognizing Risks and Taking Action. Fordham L. Rev., 78, 2329. The developments of the past two years have focused national attention on the operation of our financial markets. There are a number of interrelated factors that have contributed to our collective inability to appreciate the extent of the risks to which investors, lenders, homeowners, and taxpayers were exposed. More factors will undoubtedly become apparent as illiquid assets in lenders’ portfolios shift from being marked to model to being marked to market.4 Uncollectible loans will be restructured or resolved through debtors’ bankruptcies. Judges will determine how the obligations of lenders who did not record their interest in their parcel of real estate with the county recorder’s office should be prioritized. Presumably, courts will arrive at a consensus regarding whether to permit foreclosures when the entity seeking to foreclose is either an investor holding only one slice of a loan (rather than the entire obligation) or a nonlending servicing representative, such as Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (MERS), which is a nominee for the lender and its successors in interest but has no lending relationship with the borrower. 5

Consumer Protection: The Equal Credit Opportunity Act: Guarantors as Applicants–Did the Cost of a Violation Go Up, Stafford, J. D. (1987). Consumer Protection: The Equal Credit Opportunity Act: Guarantors as Applicants–Did the Cost of a Violation Go Up. Okla. L. Rev., 40, 431.

Federal reserve system, Jones, W., Ramos, M., Officer, C. R. A., de Puerto, B. P., Rico, S. J., Rico, P., … & Bryce, T. A. (2001). Federal reserve system. System.

Fair Lending Conference: Home Mortgage Disclosure Act Report, Fishbein, A. (1994). Fair Lending Conference: Home Mortgage Disclosure Act Report. J. Marshall L. Rev., 28, 343. Home Mortgage Disclosure Act’ (HMDA) data may be useful in attempting to determine a pattern of discrimination within a certain geographic area. While, of course, an attorney must consider a specific individual’s case when drafting a complaint, HMDA data should be analyzed in order to determine whether the case should be expanded into a class action. Unfortunately, the possibility of utilizing HMDA data for this purpose has been ignored by lawyers working in fair housing agencies. However, both in-house and external banking attorneys are indicating that they anticipate an increase in class action litigation over lending discrimination as a result of published HMDA data. It is expected that much will be published about the defenses against the utilization of HMDA data. Moreover, an attorney can effectively use HMDA data to not only identify certain lenders who are discriminating, but also to recognize mortgage market trends which may in some instances account for why the client was really denied credit. In addition, the Loan Application Register (LAR), which is kept by lending institutions, can be used to determine if a lender has discriminated against a minority applicant who wanted to move to a predominantly white area or against a white applicant who wanted to relocate to a predominantly non-white area. The LAR may also indicate if a lender has withdrawn from a market which has become increasingly minority.

… of Community Reinvestment Act The Federal Reserve Board today announced a series of steps, based on recommendations from its Consumer Advisory Council to …, Act, R. Enforcement of Community Reinvestment Act The Federal Reserve Board today announced a series of steps, based on recommendations from its Consumer Advisory Council to strengthen.

The consumer Advisory Council: the first five years, Hakala, M. A. (1981). The consumer Advisory Council: the first five years. Fed. Res. Bull., 67, 529.

Recently, from the Cleveland Fed, Helen, M. (2019). Recently, from the Cleveland Fed. Policy.

Fair Lending Conference: Home Mortgage Disclosure Act Report, 28 J. Marshall L. Rev. 343 (1995), Fishbein, A. (1995). Fair Lending Conference: Home Mortgage Disclosure Act Report, 28 J. Marshall L. Rev. 343 (1995). The John Marshall Law Review, 28(2), 4. Home Mortgage Disclosure Act’ (HMDA) data may be useful in attempting to determine a pattern of discrimination within a certain geographic area. While, of course, an attorney must consider a specific individual’s case when drafting a complaint, HMDA data should be analyzed in order to determine whether the case should be expanded into a class action. Unfortunately, the possibility of utilizing HMDA data for this purpose has been ignored by lawyers working in fair housing agencies. However, both in-house and external banking attorneys are indicating that they anticipate an increase in class action litigation over lending discrimination as a result of published HMDA data. It is expected that much will be published about the defenses against the utilization of HMDA data. Moreover, an attorney can effectively use HMDA data to not only identify certain lenders who are discriminating, but also to recognize mortgage market trends which may in some instances account for why the client was really denied credit. In addition, the Loan Application Register (LAR), which is kept by lending institutions, can be used to determine if a lender has discriminated against a minority applicant who wanted to move to a predominantly white area or against a white applicant who wanted to relocate to a predominantly non-white area. The LAR may also indicate if a lender has withdrawn from a market which has become increasingly minority.

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