Uniform Bill of Lading – Definition

Cite this article as:"Uniform Bill of Lading – Definition," in The Business Professor, updated September 10, 2019, last accessed June 2, 2020, https://thebusinessprofessor.com/lesson/uniform-bill-of-lading-definition/.

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Uniform Bill of Lading Definition

A uniform bill of lading refers to a contract or an agreement between two consenting parties which states how a property, goods or cargo will be transported. The exporter and the carrier are the two parties involved in the contract. Included in a uniform bill of lading are shipping information, details of the shipper, the departure and destination, transport time or schedule, the terms of carrier liability, and other basic information. Furthermore, how exporters or owners can file a claim for a damaged shipment is contained in the uniform bill of lading.

A Little More on What is a Uniform Bill of Lading

In the United States, the uniform bill of lading was passed and enacted by the Uniform Law Commission in 1909. Its passage was to cater for issues surrounding transportation of goods by a carrier, The uniform bill of lading contains basic information about the goods being transported as well as other provisions and insurance that cover the shipment. The exact type of shipment, the nature of the goods, money paid for transportation and other vital information are included.

Components of the Bill of Lading

Aside from providing basic information about the shipment, the uniform bill of lading also serves as an evidence that the goods are delivered to the receiver and the bill signed by the recipient upon delivery. The condition in which the goods are delivered, the time and other terms of the contract are vital. For instance, the goods delivered are damaged or there is a missing item, the receiver can file claims of lost or damaged item. In this scenario, the uniform bill of lading is regraded clause.

However, if the goods are delivered in perfect condition without any defects, the bill of lading is clean.

As stated in the bill of lading, the carrier is liable for any loss or damage that happens to the goods in the process of transporting them to the recipient. Carriers are liable for actual loss in a bill of lading. The bill of lading as provides a receiver with a legal document that can be tendered when  filing a claim on damaged, lost or unacceptable goods. Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 1005, Section 14706, allows bill of lading to be used as a legal document in freight disputes.

Changes in the Uniform Bill of Lading

There are certain amendments that were done to the uniform bill of lading. The changes were made gradually but became effective in August 2016. The amendment of the bill of lading provides enough time for carriers to complete deliveries. The delivery time was extended to cater for unseen circumstances that can arise in the course of delivery. Also, the new bill of lading allows only carrieres ‘shown as transporting the property’ to be liable to losses or damages.

References for “Uniform Bill Of Lading

https://www.investopedia.com › Business › Business Essentials

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_Bill_of_Lading_Act

www.businessdictionary.com/definition/uniform-bill-of-lading.html

Academic research for “Uniform Bill Of Lading

[PDF] The Uniform Bill of Lading, Duncan, C. S. (1917). The Uniform Bill of Lading. Journal of Political Economy, 25(7), 679-703.

CIDIP-VI: Difficulties and Achievements regarding an Inter-American Uniform Through Bill of Lading for the International Carriage of Goods by Road, de Aguirre, C. F. (2002). CIDIP-VI: Difficulties and Achievements regarding an Inter-American Uniform Through Bill of Lading for the International Carriage of Goods by Road. Unif. L. Rev. ns, 7, 775.

[PDF] Carriers-Uniform Bill of Lading-Usual Place of Delivery, Buer, R. J. (1936). Carriers-Uniform Bill of Lading-Usual Place of Delivery. Marquette Law Review, 20(4), 198.

THE UNIFORM BILL OF LADING., KNAPP, C. THE UNIFORM BILL OF LADING.

Motor Carrier Receivables and Section 7 of the Uniform Bill of Lading, Salter, L. M. (1969). Motor Carrier Receivables and Section 7 of the Uniform Bill of Lading. Com. LJ, 74, 94.

Goods Shipped Under Uniform Order Bill of Lading Not Subject to Attachment While in Possession of Railroad, Crowder, C. V., & Rep, S. E. Goods Shipped Under Uniform Order Bill of Lading Not Subject to Attachment While in Possession of Railroad.

Origin, Development and Functions of the Uniform Domestic Bill of Lading, Strange, R. W. (1928). Origin, Development and Functions of the Uniform Domestic Bill of Lading. American Bar Association Journal, 14(7), 378-383.

… favor of a particular shipper to permit actual knowledge by a carrier to sub-stitute for written notice of a claim as required by the uniform bill of lading, where the carrier …, GENERAL, I. In Hopper Paper Co. v. Baltimore and Ohio R. Co.(USCA 7), 178 F 2d 179, it was held not to be discrimination in favor of a particular shipper to permit actual knowledge by a carrier to sub-stitute for written notice of a claim as required by the uniform bill of lading, where the carrier sought to avoid the payment of a claim.

Multimodal Transportation: An American Perspective on Carrier Liability and Bill of Lading Issues, Wood, S. G. (1998). Multimodal Transportation: An American Perspective on Carrier Liability and Bill of Lading Issues. Am. J. Comp. L. Supp., 46, 403.

The Bill of Lading as Collateral Security under Federal Laws, Thulin, F. (1918). The Bill of Lading as Collateral Security under Federal Laws. Michigan Law Review, 16(6), 402-420.

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