Benjamin Method – Definition

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Benjamin Method Definition

The Benjamin Method is a formula used in investment to determine the intrinsic value of stocks in a bid to find assets that are undervalued to select the most profitable assets. The Benjamin Method is a value investing strategy which is achieved through fundamental analysis of the asset. The Benjamin Method was named after Benjamin Graham, the father of value investing whose investment philosophy has helped investors and fund managers effectively select winning value stocks.

A Little More on What is the Benjamin Method

Benjamin Graham was a great investment philosopher whose investment principles spanned after his lifetime. Benjamin Graham was an investor in practise, an author and economist. His investment principle or formula popularly called the Benjamin Method became prominent in the 1930s as it applies to investments. The Benjamin Method is otherwise called the strategy of value investing through which different investors can select investments and assets based on the value they offer.

There are two categories of investors in the market, the short-term investors and the long-term investors. Given that the goals of the investors are different, their approach towards investing is also different. Through the strategy of value investing, investors can analyze stock data to determine assets that are systematically undervalued.

Example of the Benjamin Method

The illustration below would enhance a better understanding of how the Benjamin Method works;

Investor A is interested in purchasing shares in a renowned widget company in the United States. If the company trades its stock at $80 per share, and it earns a profit of $10 annually, if a smaller company offers it stock at a cheaper rate, let’s say $12 but earns a profit of only $1.5 annually, the investor will use the value investing strategy to analyze the stock data of the companies or carry out a fundamental analysis in order to select which company to invest in.

Reference for “Benjamin Method”

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/b/benjamin-method.asp

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Graham_formula

https://www.aaii.com › AAII Journal › January 2018

https://www.quora.com/Does-the-value-investing-method-of-Benjamin-Graham-work…

https://www.blinkist.com/magazine/posts/benjamin-franklin-method-success

Academics research on “Benjamin Method”

New Modernist Studies, Watten, B. (1999). New Modernist Studies.

Mobility in Immigrant New York, Hodin, M. (2011). Mobility in Immigrant New York. American Literary History23(2), 392-404.

Translating space: The politics of ruins, the remote and peripheral places, Martin, D. (2014). Translating space: The politics of ruins, the remote and peripheral places. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research38(3), 1102-1119. This essay surveys recent artistic, literary and philosophical treatments of landscape that use metaphors of ruination, remoteness and the periphery. The discussion primarily focuses on Patrick Keiller’s recent works, particularly his film Robinson in Ruins, the account of remote spaces in Paul Farley and Michael Symmons Roberts’ book Edgelands, and a collection of essays by Stavros Stavrides on peripheral urban spaces, Towards the City of Thresholds. These treatments of landscape offer an attention to the social significance of spaces overlooked within wider cultural representations of place. It is suggested that all three illustrate the argument that mundane spaces can be read and translated into politicized landscapes offering alternative readings of past events, as well as potential directions for future forms of sociality.

Benjamin’s materialist theory of experience, Wolin, R. (1982). Benjamin’s materialist theory of experience. Theory and Society11(1), 17-42.

Reviews: Recognizing European Modernities: A Montage of the Present, No Breathing Room: The Aftermath of Chernobyl, Capital Cities: International Perspectives …, Miller, R., Argenbright, R., Hardwick, W. G., Dearden, P., & Chisholm, M. (1996). Reviews: Recognizing European Modernities: A Montage of the Present, No Breathing Room: The Aftermath of Chernobyl, Capital Cities: International Perspectives, Protected Area Economics and Policy: Linking Conservation and Sustainable Development, Territorial Competition in an Integrating Europe.

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