Association of Southeast Asian Nations – Definition

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Association of Southeast Asian Nations – Definition

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is a group of countries that collaborate to promote solidarity and political, economic, social and cultural growth. ASEAN functions as an intergovernmental organization that focuses on a particular region in order to effectively achieve cooperation and growth among the participating countries. ASEAN comprises 10 countries in Southeast Asia. This association also maintains relationship between other countries in the Asia-Pacific region with the aim of establishing a global network and relationship between the partners.

A Little More on What is the Association of Southeast Asian Nations – ASEAN

Before the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was formed, the Association of Southeast Asia (ASA) existed since 1961. This was a group of three countries that came together hedge the spread of communism in the region and also calm member countries.

Established in 1967, ASEAN has grown to be a reputable organization and the global fore and commands significant influence in economic and diplomatic discussions around the world. ASEAN focuses on promoting social, cultural, political, economic and military integration between its members who are Southeast Asian countries. When it first started, there were five ASEAN members, namely; Philipines, Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand, and Malaysia. Other countries that later joined ASEAN are Cambodia, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar. The secretariat of ASEAN is located in Jakarta, Indonesia, where all administrative works are run.

Reference for “Association of Southeast Asian Nations – ASEAN”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Association_of_Southeast_Asian_Nations

https://asean.org/

https://www.state.gov/p/eap/regional/asean/

https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/asean-association-southeast-asian-nations

https://www.nti.org/learn/treaties-and…/association-southeast-asian-nations-asean/

Academics research on “Association of Southeast Asian Nations – ASEAN”

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations:” Security Community” or” Defence Community”?, Acharya, A. (1991). The Association of Southeast Asian Nations:” Security Community” or” Defence Community”?. Pacific Affairs, 159-178. A number of emerging security threats and the prospective settlement of the Cambodia conflict have produced a search for new regional security arrangements in Southeast Asia. This paper looks specifically at the proposal for an ASEAN defence community. Such a direction for ASEAN would represent a major shift from the hitherto preference for bilateral security ties among its members. The paper argues that the idea of an ASEAN defence community not only faces serious barriers, but if implemented, would undermine ASEAN’s role as a “security community” in promoting peaceful settlement of intra-regional conflicts. As a framework for regional order, ASEAN’s credibility lies in promoting reconciliation with the Indochinese states. As such, its security interests are better served by expanding the scope of political cooperation in post-Cambodia Southeast Asia than by adopting a military role.

CO2 emissions, energy consumption and economic growth in Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries: A cointegration approach, Saboori, B., & Sulaiman, J. (2013). CO2 emissions, energy consumption and economic growth in Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries: A cointegration approach. Energy55, 813-822. This study examines the cointegration and causal relationship between economic growth, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and energy consumption in selected Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries for the period 1971–2009. The recently developed Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) methodology and Granger causality test based on Vector Error-Correction Model (VECM) were used to conduct the analysis. There was cointegration relationship between variables in all the countries under the study with statistically significant positive relationship between carbon emissions and energy consumption in both the short and long-run. The long-run elasticities of energy consumption with respect to carbon emissions are higher than the short-run elasticities. This implies that carbon emissions level is found to increase in respect to energy consumption over time in the selected ASEAN countries. A significant non-linear relationship between carbon emissions and economic growth was supported in Singapore and Thailand for the long-run which supports the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis. The Granger causality results suggested a bi-directional Granger causality between energy consumption and CO2 emissions in all the five ASEAN countries. This implies that carbon emissions and energy consumption are highly interrelated to each other. All the variables are found to be stable suggesting that all the estimated models are stable over the study period.

English as the official working language of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN): Features and strategies, Kirkpatrick, A. (2008). English as the official working language of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN): Features and strategies. English Today24(2), 27-34.

The middle-income trap: Issues for members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Tran, V. T. (2013). The middle-income trap: Issues for members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. The problem faced by many of the economies making up the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is whether they can avoid the middle-income trap and advance to the high-income level. What is needed for them to avoid the middle-income trap? This paper attempts to answer this question by building an analytical framework based on the factors that determine each development stage of an economy, and by comparing the current situation of four ASEAN middle-income countries with the experience of the Republic of Korea, a country that managed to overcome the middle-income trap and reach the high-income level in the late 1990s.

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Nesadurai, H. E. (2008). The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). New political economy13(2), 225-239.

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