Amotion – Definition

Cite this article as:"Amotion – Definition," in The Business Professor, updated May 14, 2019, last accessed June 3, 2020, https://thebusinessprofessor.com/lesson/amotion-definition/.

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Amotion Definition

Amotion refers to an act of depriving an individual of personal possessions.

In corporate law, amotion is unlawful removal of an officer or executive from his post without any justification or before the expiration of his tenure in office.

When an official is evicted or ousted from his post wrongfully. Although, in most cases, the ousted official or executive still maintains the right to be a member of the organization. This is different from disenfranchisement which means total dismissal or ejection from the organization.

References for Amotion

Academic Research on Amotion

Removal of the Corporate Director During His Term of Office, Travers Jr, A. H. (1967). Iowa L. Rev., 53, 389.

The rising tension between shareholder and director power in the common law world, Hill, J. G. (2010). Corporate Governance: An International Review, 18(4), 344-359.

Power of a Corporation to Remove Directors for Cause, Talcott, W. E. (1887). Cent. LJ, 24, 99.

OHIO LAW JOURNAL., Kumler, P. I. (1887). OHIO LAW JOURNAL.

Enforcement of by-laws, Conyngton, T. (1913). Journal of Accountancy (pre-1986), 15(000003), 157.

ARBITRATION AS A MEANS OF SETTLING DISPUTES, CORPORATIONS, W. C.

WVith the Unreported Decisions, Miller, J. power, 6, 17-31.

The Delaware General Corporation Law: Recent Amendments, Arsht, S. S., & Black, L. S. (1975). The Business Lawyer, 1021-1051.

Mutual savings and loan associations: Rehabilitation of membership rights, Yancey, D. W. (1974). Santa Clara Lawyer, 15, 635.

The effect of shareholding dispersion on the degree of control in British companies: theory and measurement, Cubbin, J., & Leech, D. (1983). The Economic Journal, 93(370), 351-369.

Corporation law in search of its future, Werner, W. (1981). Columbia Law Review, 81(8), 1611-1666.

 

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