American Risk and Insurance Association – Definition

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American Risk and Insurance Association (ARIA) Definition

The American Risk and Insurance Association (ARIA) is an organization established in 1932 for academics, scholars, professionals and, associates in the insurance industry. The primary objective of this association is to promote the knowledge of risk management and insurance among these professionals. This professional organization also enhances the transfer of knowledge between the professional that will promote further research in the insurance industry.

ARIA holds annual conferences and research for professionals in the insurance industry. This professional body publishes two journals which are the ‘Journal of Risk and Insurance’ and “Risk Management and Insurance Review’.

A Little More on What is the American Risk and Insurance Association (ARIA)

The American Risk and Insurance Association (ARIA) was created to advance the knowledge of risk management and insurance amongst professionals in the insurance industry. This is a global organization that aids collaboration and transfer of knowledge between insurance professionals through symposiums, conferences, researches, and recognitions.

As a professional body, ARIA comprises academics, professionals, researchers, students and, associates in the insurance industry. This organization provides a platform for collaboration and exchange of information between members. The main publication of ARIA is the Journal of Risk and Insurance (JRI) which provides new and relevant information for industry practitioners.

There are some core areas that the American Risk and Insurance Association (ARIA) treats in its publication. The Journal of Risk and Insurance (JRI) explores the following subject areas:

  • Insurance regulation and restriction
  • Risk management
  • Organization of insurance markets
  • Insurance cycles
  • Economics of insurance institutions
  • Economic cycles of insurance markets
  • Social insurance, employee benefits and pension plans
  • Utility theory and demand for insurance, and many other areas.

There are three core values of the American Risk and Insurance Association, these are knowledge, community and society. The promotion and transfer of knowledge is a key attribute of ARIA. Through conferences, research papers, and symposiums the association facilitates the transfer of knowledge.

Promoting a community of scholars and professionals is another core value of ARIA. By building a vast community of experts, the association impacts society at large.

Reference for “American Risk and Insurance Association (ARIA)”

www.aria.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Risk_and_Insurance_Association

https://www.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jori.12271?af=R

https://www.jstor.org/publisher/ari

https://www.insuranceopedia.com/…/739/american-risk-and-insurance-association-aria

Academics research on “American Risk and Insurance Association (ARIA)”

Presidential Address: American Risk and Insurance Association August, 1986: Revitalizing Risk and Insurance Education and Research, Cummins, J. D. (1987). Presidential Address: American Risk and Insurance Association August, 1986: Revitalizing Risk and Insurance Education and Research. The Journal of Risk and Insurance54(1), 9-20.

Collegiate risk management and insurance education, Gardner, L. A., & Schmit, J. T. (1995). Collegiate risk management and insurance education. Journal of Risk and Insurance, 625-648. This article reports results from a survey of collegiate risk management and insurance (RMI) education programs in the United States and Canada. The study was requested by the Strategic Planning Committee of the American Risk and Insurance Association. The results update and extend those reported in the last such survey, completed in 1988 by Thrower and Gardner. The number of collegiate RMI programs has remained relatively stable since 1988. More than 26,000 students took RMI courses during 1992 through 1993 at over 200 responding schools. Furthermore, growth seems likely, especially among schools with established RMI programs.

The Journal of Risk and Insurance: A 75‐Year Historical Perspective, Weiss, M. A., & Qiu, J. (2008). The Journal of Risk and Insurance: A 75Year Historical Perspective. Journal of Risk and Insurance75(2), 253-274. This research provides a comprehensive historical analysis of articles published in The Journal of Risk and Insurance over the 75‐year period from 1932 to 2006. Historical statistics are provided including the number of articles, number of authors per article, geographic location of contributors, leading contributors, author affiliation (industry or academic), the proportion of articles that are theoretical and empirical, and topics covered. Statistics relating to the entire 75‐year period are provided as well as breakdowns by decade. The results indicate that the contributors to The Journal of Risk and Insurance have become more international over time, average article length and average number of authors per article have increased over time, and empirical articles appear more frequently than theoretical articles.

What are the major journals that members of ARIA read?, Outreville, J. F., & Malouin, J. L. (1985). What are the major journals that members of ARIA read?. Journal of Risk and Insurance, 723-733. The purpose of this study is to provide a ranking of journals based on their relative quality and impact as perceived by members of the American Risk and Insurance Association.

Leading contributors to insurance research, Cox, L. A., & Gustavson, S. G. (1990). Leading contributors to insurance research. Journal of Risk and Insurance, 260-281. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the research literature in the area of risk and insurance and assesses the total productivity of individual authors, their employers, and the institutions granting authors’ terminal degrees. The study sample encompasses all original articles and notes published in 22 leading research journals from 1976 through 1986. The productivity measures impound both quantitative raw measures and peer perceptions of journal quality. The results reveal evidence of dynamic change and broadening participation among contributors to the risk and insurance research literature.

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