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Accredited Asset Management Specialist – Definition

Cite this article as:"Accredited Asset Management Specialist – Definition," in The Business Professor, updated September 21, 2019, last accessed July 12, 2020, https://thebusinessprofessor.com/lesson/accredited-asset-management-specialist-definition/.

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Accredited Asset Management Specialist Definition

Individuals who have completed a course of study on financial planning that encompasses investments, insurance, tax, retirement and other financial related studies are called financial professionals. Accredited Asset Management Specialist (AAMS) is a professional designation or certificate given to financial professionals that have completed a self-study program in the College for Financial Planning (CFP).

CFP awards this professional designation to those who have completed the study, passed the exam and agree to abide by code of ethics.

A Little More on What is an Accredited Asset Management Specialist – AAMS

Financial professionals who have completed their study are awarded AAMS by the College of Financial Planning (CFP). Holders of this professional designation can use the AAMS for two years to get substantial jobs. They also enjoy professional reputation of prestige.

AAMS started in 1994, CFP now administers or runs the self-study program on their online platform. Individuals who want to work at professionals in the financial service industry can enroll for the program which contains 12 modules, sit for the exam and agree to live by the codes of ethics binding other professionals. Once they have successfully done this, CFP awards them with Accredited Asset Management Specialist (AAMS) certificate.

AAMS Recognition and Continuing Education

AAMS is listed by a professional designation by the Financial Industry Regulation Authority (FINRA), although, FINRA does not endorse any professional designation.

The AAMS program covers a wide range of financial topics, it consists of 12 modules covering topics, such as investments, insurance, retirement, taxation, estate planning and others.

Aside from AAMS being approved by FINRA, it is also seen as a form of continuing education by many organizations in the financial industry.

AAMS professional designation comes with a continuing education for individuals interested in this certification. They must complete 16 hours of continuing education every two years and pay a fee. Courses of topics taught in this program are based on real life happenings.

AAMS Course Content and Examination

Undergoing courses in the financial planning self-program does not automatically guarantee that an individual would be awarded with AAMS. Participants must sit for an exam covering all topics treated in the course such as investment strategies, investors, policy and change; risk, return and investment performance and others.

Only individuals who pass the exam can be referred to as certified financial professionals and can be awarded AAMS. In addition to passing the exam, these professionals must agree to uphold the codes of ethics of the profession. Professionals with the AAMS designation can work in different capacities such as investment advisors, financial advisors, registered representatives and financial consultants.

Reference for “Accredited Asset Management Specialist – AAMS”

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/a/accredited-asset-management-specialist-aams.asp

https://cffpdesignations.com/Designation/AAMS

https://www.youracclaim.com/…/accredited-asset-management-specialist-or-aams-prof…

https://www.cffp.edu/AAMS

www.investorwords.com/…/Accredited_Asset_Management_Specialist_AAMS.html

https://www.payscale.com/…Accredited_Asset_Management_Specialist_(AAMS)/Salary

Academic research on “Accredited Asset Management Specialist – AAMS”

Certifiably empowering: Hot fields in which certification may boost your career, Hansen, K. (2006). Certifiably empowering: Hot fields in which certification may boost your career. Quintessential Careers, available at: http://quintcareers. com/certification/career_ certifications. html (accessed August 30, 2006).

Private protected areas: management regimes, tenure arrangements and protected area categorization in East Africa, Carter, E., Adams, W. M., & Hutton, J. (2008). Private protected areas: management regimes, tenure arrangements and protected area categorization in East Africa. Oryx, 42(2), 177-186. Private sector bodies can be important owners and managers of conservation areas. However, little is known about the extent, scale and scope of private protected areas. Understanding and defining the characterizations of private protected areas are problematic, as private sector involvement in protected areas can involve an array of different tenure arrangements, management approaches and levels of control. This review examines the challenges of developing protected area categorization beyond the traditional state-led model. We review private protected areas in Kenya and Tanzania, exploring their tenure, the nature of the private sector organizations managing them, and the extent of control exercised within them. Drawing on this we develop a working typology with the aim to encourage further discourse amongst the conservation community on the emerging phenomenon of private protected areas.

The Legal Propriety of Investment by American Fiduciaries in the Shares of Boston-Type Open-End Investment Trusts, Shattuck, M. A. (1945). The Legal Propriety of Investment by American Fiduciaries in the Shares of Boston-Type Open-End Investment Trusts. BUL Rev., 25, 1.

An industry-driven model of hospitality curriculum for programs housed in accredited colleges of business, Gursoy, D., & Swanger, N. (2004). An industry-driven model of hospitality curriculum for programs housed in accredited colleges of business. Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Education, 16(4), 13-20. The purposes of this study were to measure the perceptions of industry professionals regarding the importance of course subject areas in hospitality management curriculum for a program housed in an accredited college of business and economics, to identify any gaps between the industry needs and the current curriculum of the program, and to propose a model for hospitality curricula. A questionnaire, using a 5-point Likert scale, was sent out to 2339 hospitality industry professionals, with 328 (14.02%) respondents. Of the 40 course subject matter variables measured, ethics was ranked the most important—followed by leadership, preparation for industry employment, internships/industry experience, hospitality management and organization, and operations analysis. A proposed model for curriculum for hospitality programs housed in accredited colleges of business is presented.

An industry-driven model of hospitality curriculum for programs housed in accredited colleges of business: Part II, Gursoy, D., & Swanger, N. (2005). An industry-driven model of hospitality curriculum for programs housed in accredited colleges of business: Part II. Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Education, 17(2), 46-56. The purpose of this study was to further develop the curriculum model for hospitality programs housed in accredited colleges of business that was proposed by Gursoy and Swanger (2004). This study provides a list of suggested content items for each course recommended in the Gursoy and Swanger model that was derived from a survey of hospitality business industry professionals. The survey instrument that was used to measure the perceptions of industry professionals regarding the importance of course content items in hospitality management curriculum was developed using a four-step procedure. Results of the survey indicated that of the 128 course-content variables assessed, oral communication skills were rated the most important–followed by leadership skills, a clear understanding of profit and loss statements, good work habits, customer service skills, and development of personal and professional ethics. Based on the responses from 328 industry professionals from over 190 companies, a suggested grouping of the course content items for each course was proposed.

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